Info
Info

UCLA Develop Efficient Semiconductor Material For Thermal Management

New material draws heat away from hotspots much faster than current materials, which could lead to dramatic improvements in computer chip performance and energy efficiency

Working to address “hotspots" in computer chips that degrade their performance, UCLA engineers have developed a new semiconductor material, defect-free boron arsenide, that is more effective at drawing and dissipating waste heat than any other known semiconductor or metal materials.

This could potentially revolutionize thermal management designs for computer processors and other electronics, or for light-based devices like LEDs.


Yongjie Hu, UCLA assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering

The study was recently published in Science and was led by Yongjie Hu, UCLA assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering.

Computer processors have continued to shrink down to nanometer sizes where today there can be billions of transistors are on a single chip. This phenomenon is described under Moore’s Law, which predicts that the number of transistors on a chip will double about every two years. Each smaller generation of chips helps make computers faster, more powerful and able to do more work. But doing more work also means they’re generating more heat.

Managing heat in electronics has increasingly become one of the biggest challenges in optimizing performance. High heat is an issue for two reasons. First, as transistors shrink in size, more heat is generated within the same footprint. This high heat slows down processor speeds, in particular at “hotspots" on chips where heat concentrates and temperatures soar. Second, a lot of energy is used to keep those processors cool. If CPUs did not get as hot in the first place, then they could work faster and much less energy would be needed to keep them cool.



Thermal Semiconductor Schematic

The UCLA study was the culmination of several years of research by Hu and his students that included designing and making the materials, predictive modeling, and precision measurements of temperatures.

The defect-free boron arsenide, which was made for first time by the UCLA team, has a record-high thermal conductivity, more than three-times faster at conducting heat than currently used materials, such as silicon carbide and copper, so that heat that would otherwise concentrate in hotspots is quickly flushed away.

“This material could help greatly improve performance and reduce energy demand in all kinds of electronics, from small devices to the most advanced computer data center equipment," Hu said. “It has excellent potential to be integrated into current manufacturing processes because of its semiconductor properties and the demonstrated capability to scale-up this technology. It could replace current state-of-the-art semiconductor materials for computers and revolutionize the electronics industry."

The study’s other authors are UCLA graduate students in Hu’s research group: Joonsang Kang, Man Li, Huan Wu, and Huuduy Nguyen.

In addition to the impact for electronic and photonics devices, the study also revealed new fundamental insights into the physics of how heat flows through a material.

“This success exemplifies the power of combining experiments and theory in new materials discovery, and I believe this approach will continue to push the scientific frontiers in many areas, including energy, electronics, and photonics applications," Hu said.

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the American Chemical Society’s Petroleum Research Fund, UCLA’s Sustainable LA Grand Challenge, and the Anthony and Jeanne Pritzker Family Foundation.

ESI’s New Allegro LC Extends High-Volume Test Capability To Larger MLCCs
Himax Technologies Rebukes Motley Fool Article
AES Announces Acquisition Of Advanced Research Manufacturing (ARM)
Thermco Systems Expands Global Operations With Acquisition Of CSD Epitaxy
Future Of Quantum Technology In UK Given Significant Funding Boost
Biosensor Allows Real-Time Oxygen Monitoring For ‘Organs-On-A-Chip’
Imec.xpand Raises EUR 117 Million To Invest In Innovative, Early-stage Ideas
Palomar Technologies Awarded ISO 9001:2015 Certificate
Webinar: On-Site Hydrogen Production Improves Safety, Quality, And Productivity In Wafer, Chip And Semiconductor Manufacturing
Shin-Etsu Silicones Of America Primed For Growth
VTT Is Ranked Fourth In The World's Largest Research Funding Programme
Cadence Recognized With Four 2018 TSMC Partner Of The Year Awards
RIT Awarded $422K Grant For PIC Technology
Infineon Expands U.S.-based IoT Security Research And Development Programs
ON Semiconductor To Demonstrate Innovation In Automotive, Power Conversion And IoT At Electronica
Picosun Launches New Solutions Specially Targeted For Healthcare Industries
Mirsense And XenomatiX Win Technology Showcase At European MEMS, Imaging And Sensors Event
NanoScientific Symposium On Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM)
Intel Respond In Court To Qualcomm’s Claims
Teledyne E2v’s Emerald 12M And 16M Image Sensors Enter Mass Production
Brixon Licenses Sensor Technology From ORNL
Helium Leak Detector Solutions
Pfeiffer Vacuum Opens New High-tech Production Site In Romania
Siltectra Ramps Up Wafering Services

Info
×
Search the news archive

To close this popup you can press escape or click the close icon.
Logo
×
Logo
×
Register - Step 1

You may choose to subscribe to the Silicon Semiconductor Magazine, the Silicon Semiconductor Newsletter, or both. You may also request additional information if required, before submitting your application.


Please subscribe me to:

 

You chose the industry type of "Other"

Please enter the industry that you work in:
Please enter the industry that you work in:
 
X
Info
X
Info